"I dare not hope. I never was fainthearted before; but I cannot believe such a creature cares for me."

thegetty:

Tumblr Pro since the advent of photography.

Portrait of a Man, about 1854, Unknown maker. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Portrait of a Man Reading a Newspaper, about 1842, John Plumbe, Jr. J. Paul Getty Museum.
[Portrait of an Asian Man in Top Hat], about 1856, James P. Weston. J. Paul Getty Museum.

oldtimeystjohnsscifi:

Evacuation of Duckworth Street during The Great Atari Invasion of 1890

oldtimeystjohnsscifi:

Evacuation of Duckworth Street during The Great Atari Invasion of 1890

oldtimeystjohnsscifi:

Luke Skywalker waiting for a snowplow, Water Street 1891

oldtimeystjohnsscifi:

Luke Skywalker waiting for a snowplow, Water Street 1891

umeko-sherlolly:

Victorian Girls♡

other works

todaysdocument:


"Stay off gobbledygook language."

Seventy years ago, there just wasn’t a suitable term for those brain-scalding, rage-inducing concoctions of grammar and syntax masquerading as language. Well, Mr. Maury Maverick came up with one:
"Gobbledygook."
Here is his memorandum to the staff of the federal agency he headed, the Smaller War Plants Corporation; the first known usage of this faintly exotic, yet viciously accurate, addition to the English language.  

Memorandum from Maury Maverick to Everybody in Smaller War Plants Corporation. 3/24/1944
From the series: Field Letters and Memoranda, 1943 - 1945. Records of the Smaller War Plants Corporation, 1940 - 1948

(Today’s post comes via Alan Walker, an archivist in Research Services at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland.)

These days Mr. Maverick would just be seen as a rather outspoken proponent of what we in the government call “plain language.”
Maybe you call it “jargon,”  ”legalese,” or  ”doublespeak” —  what’s your favorite term for “Gobbledygook”?

Not Victorian, but this really should get more notes. Gobbledygook is one of the best word ever. EVER.

todaysdocument:

"Stay off gobbledygook language."

Seventy years ago, there just wasn’t a suitable term for those brain-scalding, rage-inducing concoctions of grammar and syntax masquerading as language. Well, Mr. Maury Maverick came up with one:

"Gobbledygook."

Here is his memorandum to the staff of the federal agency he headed, the Smaller War Plants Corporation; the first known usage of this faintly exotic, yet viciously accurate, addition to the English language.  

Memorandum from Maury Maverick to Everybody in Smaller War Plants Corporation. 3/24/1944

From the series: Field Letters and Memoranda, 1943 - 1945. Records of the Smaller War Plants Corporation, 1940 - 1948

(Today’s post comes via Alan Walker, an archivist in Research Services at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland.)

These days Mr. Maverick would just be seen as a rather outspoken proponent of what we in the government call “plain language.

Maybe you call it “jargon,”  ”legalese,” or  ”doublespeak” —  what’s your favorite term for “Gobbledygook”?

Not Victorian, but this really should get more notes. Gobbledygook is one of the best word ever. EVER.

feuille-d-automne:

" Snapshot " in Helsinki, April 1891
Via

feuille-d-automne:

" Snapshot " in Helsinki, April 1891

Via

mollpaper dress

andrealaker:

So I was checking Atelier Angel http://atelierangel.tumblr.com/

and inspired from dolce and gabbana aw/2012:

image

image

And I tought this is the perfect mollpaper dress inspired by the conspiracy. Plus the purple shirt is dolce so now the two lovebirds will be coordinated.  

gutsanduppercuts:

The Victorian and gentlemanly martial art of Bartitsu. This is the martial art they use for the “Sherlock Holmes” movies, though I’d wager they that slip a bit of Wing Chun in there too.

Thanks for following! I really like your blog too! take care!

mollymatterrs:

Sherlock staring at the wallpaper for hours on end.

Sherlock tracing the shapes of the wallpaper pattern with his fingertips.

John asking what the hell Sherlock is doing.

Sherlock explaining that he’s channeling his Man Pain for Molly through the wallpaper.

John wondering what planet his…

sapphire1707:

Lower Lewis by emeyekayee

sapphire1707:

Lower Lewis by emeyekayee

books0977:

Portrait of a Girl (Sophie Gray), 1857. Sir John Everett Millais (English, 1829-1896). Oil on mounted paper.
Sophie Gray was the artist’s sister-in-law and one of his favourite models in the 1850s. The is alive with an electric energy between the sitter and the artist. Women of this period were not portrayed in a confrontational manner, which was unacceptable to Victorian Society. Sophie displays a direct, intimate self-confidence, creating an image far more familiar to 20th century eyes than those of her day. 

books0977:

Portrait of a Girl (Sophie Gray), 1857. Sir John Everett Millais (English, 1829-1896). Oil on mounted paper.

Sophie Gray was the artist’s sister-in-law and one of his favourite models in the 1850s. The is alive with an electric energy between the sitter and the artist. Women of this period were not portrayed in a confrontational manner, which was unacceptable to Victorian Society. Sophie displays a direct, intimate self-confidence, creating an image far more familiar to 20th century eyes than those of her day. 

elpasha71:

Penelope 1868 
Charles-François Marchal. 
This painting and its pendant, “Phryne” (location unknown), were an immediate success at the Salon of 1868. They are typical of the scenes of fashionable life in Paris that Marchal painted in the decade prior to his suicide.

Penelope is not represented as the legendary wife of Odysseus but as a contemporary woman, dutifully engaged in needlework as she dreams about her husband, portrayed in the miniature before her. By contrast, “Phryne” was intended as an analogy to the classical Athenian courtesan of the same name. Marchal depicted her in an evening dress, glancing provocatively into her mirror as she completes her toilette.

elpasha71:

Penelope 1868 

Charles-François Marchal. 

This painting and its pendant, “Phryne” (location unknown), were an immediate success at the Salon of 1868. They are typical of the scenes of fashionable life in Paris that Marchal painted in the decade prior to his suicide.

Penelope is not represented as the legendary wife of Odysseus but as a contemporary woman, dutifully engaged in needlework as she dreams about her husband, portrayed in the miniature before her. By contrast, “Phryne” was intended as an analogy to the classical Athenian courtesan of the same name. Marchal depicted her in an evening dress, glancing provocatively into her mirror as she completes her toilette.